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1 edition of Gradient sensing in eukaryotic cells found in the catalog.

Gradient sensing in eukaryotic cells

mechanism and spatiotemporal dynamics

by Kulandayan Kasi Subramanian

  • 320 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Kulandayan Kasi Subramanian
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 99 leaves :
Number of Pages99
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25901858M
OCLC/WorldCa880637171

Models for Eukaryotic Gradient Sensing: Models for Eukaryotic Gradient Sensing (cont.) Modeling Cytoskeleton Dynamics: Modeling Cytoskeleton Dynamics (cont.) Part III: Developmental Systems Biology - 'Building an Organism Starting From a Single Cell' Quorum Sensing: Final Problem Set Question Hour: Drosophila Development. Furthermore, a number of mechanistic models for gradient sensing and chemotaxis by eukaryotic cells have addressed the important questions of cell polarization, signal amplification, and.

for the accuracy of gradient sensing in elliptical cells. This accuracy for highly elliptical cells can significantly deviate from the gradient sensing limits derived for circular cells. Furthermore, we find that a cell cannot improve its sensing of the gradient steepness and direction simultaneously by elongating its cell body.   Eukaryotic cells are able to sense differences in chemoattractant—in some cells such as Dictyostelium amoeba and human neutrophils as little as 2%—across their length 3,4,5,6. These cells .

  In eukaryotic gradient sensing, the accuracy with which a single cell can sense a gradient depends on both the number of receptors expressed on the cell's surface, and the time over which the cell integrates the measured signal (see equation and the discussion following it) [17, 18, 61]. Longer integration times or larger receptor numbers allow. Bias in the gradient-sensing response of chemotactic cells Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. , No. 2 Regulation of G protein-coupled cAMP receptor activation by a .


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Gradient sensing in eukaryotic cells by Kulandayan Kasi Subramanian Download PDF EPUB FB2

A number of mechanistic models for gradient sensing and chemotaxis have addressed the important questions of cell polarization, signal amplification, and adaptation (30–36), cell movement of individual cells (37, 38), cell aggregation with cAMP degradation by PDE, as well as sensing of fluctuating concentrations (10, 40, 41).Cited by:   Chemotactic eukaryotic cells are able to adapt to uniform stimuli, while producing directional responses to chemoattractant gradients [5, 33].These fundamental features of chemoattractant sensing are clearly displayed by the GPCR/G-protein-mediated phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP 3) response in D.

discoideum cells [5, 31].Chemotaxis is essential for the survival of D Cited by:   Eukaryotic cells signal each other and respond to a wide variety of metabolites and peptides. For instance, yeast cells respond to peptide mating factors by polarizing in the direction of the source to facilitate fusion with cells of the opposite mating type.

The design was similar to one used to study gradient sensing in yeast. 2 The Cited by:   Similar ultrasensitivity in the initial response may underlie gradient sensing in other eukaryotic cells.

Analyses of such motile cells in microfluidic devices may lead to further insights. Introduction. Eukaryotic cells signal each other and respond to Cited by: The crawling movement of eukaryotic cells in response to a chemical gradient is a complex process involving the orchestration of several subcellular activities.

Although a complete description of the mechanisms underlying cell movement remains elusive, the very first step of gradient sensing, enabling the cell to perceive the imposed gradient Author: K.

Subramanian, Atul Narang. We apply linear-stability theory and perform perturbation studies to better characterize, and to generate new experimental predictions from, a model of chemotactic gradient sensing in eukaryotic cells.

The model uses reaction-diffusion equations to describe 3′ phosphoinositide signaling and its regulation at the plasma membrane. Considering an exploratory-phase patch as an independent agent of a sub-micron size that performs a biased random walk, constrained only by the surface of the ‘host’ cell, makes for a surprising analogy between the gradient-sensing strategies of bacteria and fungi ().Indeed, in both cases the agent (bacterial cell or sensing patch) moves randomly in the complex spatial profile of the.

Accuracy of direct gradient sensing by single cells single-celled eukaryotic organisms such as the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty) and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3, 4).

Dicty cells are able to sense a concentration difference of only 1–5% across the cell (5), cor. Eukaryotic cells can compare and react to the small concentration differences across their dimensions. In some cells, adaptation to constant chemotactic stimulation allows subtraction of ambient chemoattractant concentrations and greatly increases the accuracy of gradient sensing.

Cells respond to a variety of secreted molecules by modifying their physiology, growth patterns, and behavior.

Motile bacteria and eukaryotic cells can sense extracellular chemoattractants and chemorepellents and alter their movement. In this way fibroblasts and leukocytes can find their way to sites of injury and cancer cells can home in on sites that are releasing growth factors.

gradient sensing in eukaryotic cells. A typical natural habitat for social amoebae such as Dictyostelium is the complex anisotropic three-dimensional matrix of the forest floor. Under experimental conditions cells typically aggregate on a flat two-dimensional surface. We approach the problem of gradient sensing on a sphere, which.

A number of mechanistic models for gradient sensing and chemotaxis have addressed the important questions of cell polarization, signal amplification, and adaptation (30 –36), cell movement of individual cells (37,38), cell aggregation with cAMP degradation by PDE, as well as sensing of fluctuating concentrations (10,40,41).

We develop a mathematical model of phosphoinositide-mediated gradient sensing that can be applied to chemotactic behavior in highly motile eukaryotic cells such as Dictyostelium and neutrophils.

We generate four variants of our model by adjusting parameters that control the strengths of coupled positive feedbacks and the importance of molecules that translocate from the cytosol to the membrane.

Cell locomotion can be directed by external gradients of diffusible substances leading to chemotaxis. Recently, the mechanisms of gradient sensing, the cell guidance system, came under scrutiny both in experimental analysis and computational modeling.

Here, we review several recent computational models of gradient sensing in eukaryotic cells, demonstrating why some of them predict little. Eukaryotic cells respond to a chemoattractant gradient by forming intracellular gradients of signaling molecules that reflect the extracellular chemical gradient-an ability called directional sensing.

Quantitative experiments have revealed two characteristic input-output relations of the system: Fir. In this section, we consider the known biochemistry of eukaryotic gradient sensing based on activation of G-protein-associated chemokine receptors (G i family of G-proteins), as studied in D.

discoideum and neutrophils. The principal signaling pathways, shown to be essential in a variety of experiments, are illustrated in Fig. 4 A. Eukaryotic cells have the ability to sense chemoattractant gradients and to migrate toward the sources of attractants.

The chemical gradient-guided cell movement is referred to as chemotaxis. Chemoattractants are detected by members of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that link to heterotrimeric G-proteins. These observations illustrate the dynamic properties of receptors involved in gradient sensing and suggest that these may be polarized in chemotactic cells.

View Show abstract. Eukaryotic cells can detect shallow gradients of chemoattractants with exquisite precision and respond quickly to changes in the gradient steepness and direction.

Here, we describe a set of models explaining both adaptation to uniform increases in chemoattractant and persistent signaling in response to gradients. Phosphatidylinositol lipids, such as PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3, are key mediators in diverse intracellular signaling pathways. Two recent reports examine how the metabolism of these lipids by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases and the PTEN 3-phosphoinositide phosphatase may coordinate G protein coupled signaling pathways during eukaryotic chemotaxis.

Request PDF | Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Eukaryotic Gradient Sensing | The crawling movement of eukaryotic cells in response to a chemical gradient is a complex process involving the orchestration.Lackie J.M.

() Cell movement and cell behavior, Allen & Unwin, London CrossRef Google Scholar Lackie J.M. and Wilkinson P.C. () Adhesion and locomotion of neutrophil leukocytes on 2-D substrata and in 3-D matrices.Quantifying Information Transmission in Eukaryotic Gradient Sensing and Chemotactic Response Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Statistical Physics (6) April with 38 Reads.